Entries Tagged 'Security Tips' ↓

Cybersecurity Awareness: Phishing ~ Don’t Take the Bait

Did you know that over 90% of all cyberattacks begin with a phishing email?

What is phishing?

Phishing is a cybercrime in which a target or targets are contacted by email, telephone or text message by someone posing as a legitimate institution to lure individuals into providing sensitive data such as personally identifiable information, banking and credit card details, and passwords. The information is then used to access important accounts and can result in identity theft and financial loss.

How do you prevent a phishing attack?

There are always signs that something’s not right, if you pay attention and educate yourself on what to look for. To help identify a possible phishing attempt, take a look at these Social Engineering Red Flags or check out this video for tips on how to avoid taking the bait.

If you’re unsure who an email is from, even if the details appear accurate, do not respond, and do not click on any links or attachments found in that email. Always avoid sending sensitive information via email.

The best piece of advice: When in doubt, throw it out.

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our Help Desk on the first floor of Nielsen Library.

Have a great day!

ASU Computing Services

Cybersecurity Awareness: Ransomware 101

If you’ve been following recent election coverage, you may have heard about how Microsoft took action to disrupt a massive hacking operation that distributes ransomware, which the US government and independent experts have warned is one of the largest threats to the upcoming elections.

So, what is ransomware? According to the National Cybersecurity Alliance (https://staysafeonline.org/), ransomware is a type of malware that accesses a victim’s files, locks and encrypts them and then demands the victim to pay a ransom to get them back. It’s like the “digital kidnapping” of valuable data – from personal photos and memories to client information, financial records and intellectual property – and any individual or organization could be a potential target.

So, how do you avoid ransomware and prevent an attack? Suggestions include keeping a clean machine (mentioned in our last post), protecting yourself with security software, and backing up your data. For more tips, additional resources, and advice for what to do if you’re faced with a ransomware attack, check out this tip sheet: Ransomware 101

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our Help Desk on the first floor of Nielsen Library.

Have a great rest of the week!

ASU Computing Services

Cybersecurity Awareness: If You Connect It, Protect It

We all make mistakes – and cybercriminals know this. One big one? Not keeping your software up-to-date. 

Companies put out software patches for a lot of reasons, but a main one is to patch security holes. If you’re not updating, you’re not protected. So do a quick scan of all of your devices – computer, tablets, phones, routers, other connected devices – and make sure they’re running on the latest version of their software. Having the most up-to-date mobile security software, web browser, operating system and apps is the best defense against viruses, malware and other online threats.

Want to make your life easier? Turn on automatic updates so that you don’t have to think about it, and set your security software to run regular scans.

For more tips on how to keep a clean machine, check out this article from Stop.Think.Connect. (https://stopthinkconnect.org/), the global online safety awareness campaign: Keep a Clean Machine.

**Remember: If you connect it, protect it.**

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our Help Desk on the first floor of Nielsen Library.

Have a great day!

ASU Computing Services

It’s National Cybersecurity Awareness Month!

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month, a global effort to help everyone stay protected whenever and however you connect. The overarching theme for this year’s campaign is: Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart.

The cybersecurity and digital privacy of our students and employees is important and Adams State is proud to support this safety and education initiative. Throughout the month, we’ll share some tips and resources to help you protect yourself and the university while online.

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our Help Desk on the first floor of Nielsen Library.

Have a great rest of the week!

ASU Computing Services

Keep Your Halloween Cyber-Trick-Free

As we close out National Cybersecurity Awareness Month on this sunny Halloween, we hope that some of the tips we have shared have been useful. The more you know, the more you are prepared for the monsters, zombies, and mummies that are out there. Whether you’re on your phone, tablet, or computer, remember to Own IT. Protect IT. Secure IT. from things that go bump in the night or lurk in the dark web.

For some cybersecurity horror stories, check out this list of bone-chilling tales from our friends at Panda Security: Halloween Cybersecurity Horror Stories. Or, if you prefer your stories more on the cheesy side, this quick video from our colleagues at the University of Rochester has additional tips to stay safe: “The Top Ten” Movie Trailer.

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our offices in the Computing Services building.

Have a great Halloween!
ASU Computing Services

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Cybersecurity Tip #3 – Protect IT: if you connect, you must protect

It’s essential to take proactive measures to enhance cybersecurity at home, at work, and when you’re out and about. In previous weeks, we addressed how to best own and secure your personal information. Now, we need to safeguard all of that invaluable data, so here are some tips to help you “Protect IT.”

Keep a Clean Machine:

  • Keep software current – Having the most up-to-date mobile security software, web browser, operating system and apps is the best defense against viruses, malware and other online threats, so keep your software updated to the latest version available. Turn on automatic updates so that you don’t have to think about it, and set your security software to run regular scans. If prompted to update your device, don’t hesitate—do it immediately.
  • Delete when done – Many of us download apps for specific purposes, such as planning vacations, and no longer need them afterwards, or we may have previously downloaded apps that are longer useful or interesting to us. It’s a good security practice to delete all apps you no longer use.

Protect Your Personal Information:

  • Secure your devices – Use strong passphrases, passcodes, or other features such as touch identification to lock your devices. Securing your device can help protect your information if your device is lost or stolen and keep prying eyes out.
  • Now you see me, now you don’t – Some stores and other locations look for devices with WiFi or Bluetooth turned on to track your movements while you are within range. Disable WiFi and Bluetooth when not in use.

For more ideas to help you Protect IT, check out these 5 Steps to Protecting Your Digital Home from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) (https://www.cisa.gov/).

**Remember: if you connect, you must protect.**

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our offices in the Computing Services building.

Have a great day!
ASU Computing Services

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Cybersecurity Tip #2 – Secure IT: play hard to get

This week’s cybersecurity focus is to “Secure IT.” by educating yourself about phishing. The simple definition of phishing is social engineering using digital methods for malicious purposes. The definition is fluid due to constantly changing technologies, but some examples include:

  • Malicious Email – It can look like it comes from a financial institution, an e-commerce site, a government agency or any other service or business. It often urges you to act quickly, because your account has been compromised, your order cannot be fulfilled, or there is another urgent matter to address.
  • Spear Phishing – Spear phishing involves highly specialized attacks against specific targets or small groups of targets to collect information or gain access to systems. A recent example here on campus was a targeted email to students from a purported ASU alum regarding a (fake) job opportunity for dog care.
  • Imposter Scams – Gift cards are a great way to give a gift. But did you know they are also a scammer’s favorite way to steal money? Gift cards and reloading of cards is the #1 payment method for imposter scams. This scam is so widespread that the Federal Trade Commission set up a webpage to address the issue: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2018/10/scammers-demand-gift-cards.
  • Spam & Phishing on Social Networks – Spam, phishing and other scams aren’t limited to just email. They’re also prevalent on social networking sites. The same rules apply on social networks: When in doubt, throw it out. This rule applies to links in online ads, status updates, tweets and other posts.

An attack can have devastating results. For individuals, this includes unauthorized purchases, the stealing of funds, or identify theft. For corporate and government networks, phishing is often used to gain a foothold as part of a larger attack.

Criminals are always looking for ways to hook you with a new phishing scam, so play hard to get. For some simple tips to Secure IT., check out this flyer from our friends at the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies: How to spot and avoid phish.

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our offices in the Computing Services building.

Have a great day!
ASU Computing Services

Don’t forget to like us on Facebook!
www.facebook.com/ASUComputingServices

Cybersecurity Tip #1 – Own IT: manage your privacy

This week’s cybersecurity focus is to “Own IT.” by managing your privacy.

Your devices — smartphones, laptops, and wearables — make it easy to connect to the world around you, but they can also pack a lot of info about you and your friends and family, such as your contacts, photos, videos, locations and health and financial data. Here are a couple of tips to help manage your privacy in an always-on world:

  • Think before you app: Information about you, such as the games you like to play, your contacts list, where you shop and your location, has value, just like money. Be thoughtful about who gets that information and how it’s collected through apps. Remember, personal information is like money. Value it. Protect it.
  • Update your privacy settings: Want to view or change your privacy/security settings for all your different accounts, but don’t know where to find them? Our friends at the National Cyber Security Alliance have put together a list of links for popular apps, devices and online services, including social networks, email accounts, search engines, and more. Check it out here: Manage Your Privacy Settings.

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our offices in the Computing Services building.

Have a great day!
ASU Computing Services

Don’t forget to like us on Facebook!
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It’s National Cybersecurity Awareness Month!

October is upon us — the season of pumpkin spice lattes, fall foliage, and Halloween. Did you also know that October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month? That means it’s time to learn about some easy steps you can take to be safer and more secure online.

Held every October, NCSAM 2019’s theme is: Own IT. Secure IT. Protect IT., emphasizing proactive steps to enhance cybersecurity practices.

Own It.

  • Never click and tell: staying safe on social media
  • Update privacy settings
  • Keep tabs on your apps: best practices for device applications

Secure IT.

  • Shake up your passphrase protocol: create strong, unique passphrases
  • Double your login protection: turn on multi-factor authentication
  • Shop safe online
  • Play hard to get with strangers: how to spot and avoid phish

Protect IT.

  • If you connect, you must protect: updating to the latest security software, web browser and operating systems
  • Stay protected while connected: wi-fi safety
  • If you collect it, protect it: keeping customer/consumer data and information safe

Throughout the month, we’ll provide some videos, other resources, and share some tips to encourage personal accountability and proactive behavior to help protect yourself and the university online.

Computing Services is here to help you with cybersecurity and answer any questions you may have. Feel free to contact us at (719) 587-7741, computingservices@adams.edu, or stop by our offices in the Computing Services building.

Thanks!
ASU Computing Services

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Beware of Phishing Email Attacks on Campus

Computing Services has received an increased number of reported phishing emails being sent to ASU employees. Many of these messages are being sent in an effort to impersonate the President’s account to trick you into replying to the message or sharing information with the scammer. This is a classic example of a “spear phishing” attack, DO NOT reply to the email or contact the sender in any way.

With spear phishing emails or any other suspicious email messages, don’t reply or click links, and NEVER give out private and sensitive information, or your username and password. Instead, you can contact the ASU Computing Services Helpdesk at x7741, or via email at computingservices@adams.edu to let us know of the scam. You can also contact the sending department to verify its authenticity through other channels such as calling their office directly from the number listed in our campus directory or visit with them in person.

If something looks suspicious, it probably is. Computing Services will never ask you for your username and password, or any other sensitive personal information either by email or over the phone.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact the ASU Computing Services Helpdesk at computingservices@adams.edu, by phone at 719-587-7741 or in person at our Helpdesk on campus.

Computing Services