Entries Tagged 'Security Tips' ↓

Cyber Security: What is “Malware” and leave scam trolling to the experts…

We have all heard the term “malware” bandied about. Here is the explanation from the experts at the SANS institute:

Have you ever wanted to reply to the Nigerian Prince with a fortune to share?  Here are some tips from the expert:

CS Maintenance for Thursday, 10/19, 2017 & Cyber-Security Awareness Month Post #3

Beginning at 9:00 PM, campus PCs will receive updates to Windows and Java. All PC users are encouraged to log off and leave their computers on when leaving work today to aid in the installation process.

Also beginning at 9:00 PM, Computing Services will be performing maintenance on several back-end systems. There will be minimal interruptions to campus services as we perform these maintenance activities.

***NCSAM Post 3, Don’t get rained on in the Cloud!***

For our third post for National Cyber-Security Awareness month, we bring you some insight and education on the “cloud” and a little bit of humor:

http://blogs.adams.edu/computing/2017/10/cyber-security-dont-get-rained-on-in-the-cloud/

For all of the NCSAM posts, visit our blog:

https://blogs.adams.edu/computing

Computing Services thanks you for your patience and understanding as we perform these critical maintenance activities. As always, if you have any questions, please call the ASU Computing Services Helpdesk at 7741 or contact us via email at computingservices@adams.edu

Have a great day!

Computing Services

Cyber Security: Don’t get rained on in the cloud!

Don’t get rained on in the cloud!  Follow these tips on data security in the “cloud” from the experts at the SANS Institute:

Be aware of “what is being shared with whom” and try not to be in more than one place at a time on Tuesdays…

CS Maintenance for Thursday, October 12, 2017 & Cyber-Security Awareness Month Post #2

Beginning at 9:00 PM, campus Mac computers will receive updates to Safari, Chrome, Office and Flash. All Mac users are encouraged to log off and leave their computers on when leaving work today to aid in the installation process.

Also beginning at 9:00 PM, Computing Services will be performing maintenance on several back-end systems. There will be minimal interruptions to campus services as we perform these maintenance activities.

***National Cyber-Security Awareness Month Post #2***

As a reminder, October is National Cyber-Security Awareness month. Below is a link to the Computing Services blog that has our kick-off post and our new post this week, called “Cyber Security: Don’t be like Billy, Jennie, or Betty.”

https://blogs.adams.edu/computing

Computing Services thanks you for your patience and understanding as we perform these critical maintenance activities. As always, if you have any questions, please call the ASU Computing Services Helpdesk at 7741 or contact us via email at computingservices@adams.edu

Have a great day!

Computing Services

Cyber Security: Don’t be like Billy, Jennie, or Betty

Don’t be victims like the folks in this video!  Be thoughtful.  Regular updates, common sense, and backups all come into play when avoiding trouble in today’s modern computer driven world.

ASU Computing Services

computingservices@adams.edu

719-587-7741

National Cyber Security Awareness Month

It seems a day hardly goes by without word of a breach of credit card, health care information, or accounts breached. All ASU Faculty and Staff are stewards of student, employee, and institutional data and must take steps to protect it.   National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) celebrated every October – was created as a collaborative effort between government and industry to ensure every American has the resources they need to stay safer and more secure online.  This month we will provide a series of informative videos once or twice each week, culminating with the start of our required annual security training.

ASU Computing Services

computingservices@adams.edu

719-587-7741

Beware of phishing attempts targeting the ASU campus

It has been a while since Computing Services sent a reminder regarding phishing and scam emails. Phishing emails are malicious emails where the attacker will pose as a legitimate organization to attempt to trick you into clicking on malicious links, download attachments, and could possibly lead to disclosing your personal information.

Following are the steps to distinguish phishing from regular emails:

Don’t trust the display name

A favorite phishing tactic among cybercriminals is to spoof the display name of an email. Experts have found that nearly half of all email threats spoofed the brand in the display name. The bottom line is don’t trust the display name. Check the email address in the header from—if looks suspicious, don’t open the email.

Look but don’t click

Hover your mouse over any links embedded in the body of the email. If the link address looks weird, don’t click on it. If you want to test the link, open a new browser window and type in website address directly rather than clicking on the link from unsolicited emails.

Check for spelling mistakes

Brands are pretty serious about email. Legitimate messages usually do not have major spelling mistakes or poor grammar. Read your emails carefully and report anything that seems suspicious.

Analyze the salutation

Is the email addressed to a vague “Valued Customer?” If so, watch out—legitimate businesses will often use a personal salutation with your first and last name.

Don’t give out personal information

Legitimate banks and most other companies will never ask for personal credentials via email.

Beware of urgent or threatening language in the subject line

Invoking a sense of urgency or fear is a common phishing tactic. Beware of subject lines that claim your “account has been suspended” or your account had an “unauthorized login attempt.”

Review the signature

Lack of details about the signer or how you can contact a company strongly suggests a phish. Legitimate businesses always provide contact details.

Don’t click on attachments

Including malicious attachments that contain viruses and malware is a common phishing tactic. Malware can damage files on your computer, steal your passwords or spy on you without your knowledge. Don’t open any email attachments you weren’t expecting.

Don’t trust the header from email address

Fraudsters not only spoof brands in the display name, but also spoof brands in the header from email address.

Don’t believe everything you see

Phishers are extremely good at what they do. Just because an email has convincing brand logos, language, and a seemingly valid email address, does not mean that it’s legitimate. Be skeptical when it comes to your email messages—if it looks even remotely suspicious, don’t open it.

If you have replied to phishing emails, and have sent money, please report this fraud to the ASU Police Department at (719)587-7901.

Final reminder, Computing Services will never ask for your username and password via email.

If you have additional questions contact us at:

Computing Services

computingservices@adams.edu

(719) 587-7741

Tip #2 for NCSAM Awareness Month!

We are now well into National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Remember, you can always check the Stay Safe Online NCSAM website for more information and tips!

www.staysafeonline.org/ncsam

Cyber security is all about keeping your information safe, including your financial and personal information. In addition to keeping it secure, it’s important to keep it backed up!

Ever lost your phone or tablet? Ever accidentally washed a flash drive, that just happened to have an important copy of a paper? There is even malware that will lock or corrupt important documents.
A backup is a second copy of all your important files – for example, your photos, videos, and documents. Instead of storing it all in one place (like your computer), make sure you keep another copy of everything somewhere safe.

All students have free storage space on our Adams State file server, which is backed up by Computing Services every night. In addition to being accessible in the student labs, you can access your files anywhere via a web browser or mobile app.

Check out our how-to on accessing myfiles.adams.edu:

http://howto.adams.edu/index.php/Myfiles.adams.edu_-_Home_and_Shared_Network_Drives

You can also store multiple copies of your files on Google Drive. All ASU students get unlimited storage on their student Google Drive free.

drive.google.com

For more information and tips on backups, check out World Backup Day’s website:

http://www.worldbackupday.com/

If you would like more information on any of our services please let us know!

STOP.  Before you use the Internet, take time to understand the risks and learn how to spot potential problems.

THINK. Take a moment to be certain the path is clear ahead. Watch for warning signs and consider how your actions online could impact your safety, as well as your friend’s and family’s.

CONNECT. Enjoy the Internet with greater confidence, knowing you’ve taken the right steps to safeguard yourself and your computer.

ASU Computing Services
computingservices@adams.edu
719-587-7741

Don’t forget to like us on Facebook
www.facebook.com/ASUComputingServices
www.facebook.com/ASUResNet

Tip #1 for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM)

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM), now in its 13th year, was created to help everyone have the resources to stay safe and secure online.

STOP. THINK. CONNECT.: The Basic Steps to Online Safety and Security

Staying safer and more secure online starts with STOP. THINK. CONNECT. – the simple, actionable advice anyone can follow.

STOP: make sure security measures are in place.

THINK: about the consequences of your actions and behaviors online.

CONNECT: and enjoy the Internet.  

For more tips visit www.staysafeonline.org.

First and foremost, keep in mind that technology alone will never be able to fully protect you. Attackers have learned that the easiest way to bypass even the most advanced security technology is by attacking you. If they want your password, credit card, or personal data, the easiest thing for them to do is to trick you into giving them this information. For example, they can call you pretending to be Microsoft tech support and claim that your computer is infected, when in reality they are just cyber criminals that want you to give them access to your computer. Or perhaps they will send you an email explaining that your package could not be delivered and ask you to click on a link to confirm your mailing address, when in reality they are tricking you into visiting a malicious website that will hack into your computer. This is how attacks such as Ransomware or CEO Fraud start. Ultimately, the greatest defense against attackers is you. Be suspicious. By using common sense, you can spot and stop most attacks.

Sans OUCH! October 2016 Monthly Security Awareness Newsletter

To see the OUCH! Newsletter in its entirety, as well as subscribe to more security tips please visit:

https://securingthehuman.sans.org/resources/newsletters/ouch/2016
ASU Computing Services

computingservices@adams.edu

719-587-7741

For more security tips and tech updates throughout the year, like us on Facebook!

www.facebook.com/ASUComputingServices

www.facebook.com/ASUResNet

Important Copyright Notice and Information for Students

As the fall semester gets underway, I’m writing to remind you of the risks involved with illegally downloading and/or sharing of copyrighted music, movies, games and software over the Internet. Unauthorized obtaining, sharing or offering such copyrighted material is illegal and in violation of U.S. copyright law. If caught, you may face severe civil and criminal penalties, including prison and monetary damages. Anyone found to have infringed a copyrighted work may be liable for statutory damages of up to $30,000 for each work and, if found to be willful, that amount may be increased up to $150,000 for each work infringed. Movie and recording companies actively monitor the Internet to identify individuals who are illegally downloading and/or sharing movies and music via peer-to-peer networks.

ASU fully complies with Federal law and takes prompt action when notified that one of its students may be illegally downloading and/or sharing copyrighted material. University Policy 500-008, Unauthorized Downloading and File Sharing of Copyrighted Digital Materials, is located on the ASU Computing Services Website, at https://www.adams.edu/administration/computing/policies.php. If caught, ASU penalties could include loss of access to the campus computer network, disciplinary action and in extreme cases, expulsion from the University.

You may think that the large movie or recording companies won’t bother prosecuting a single university student downloading or sharing copyrighted material. Think again. Organizations such as the Recording Industry Association of America are serious about protecting their copyrighted material. In 2009, a Boston University graduate student was ordered to pay $675,000 for illegally downloading and distributing 30 songs. This comes out to $22,500, per incident, of copyright infringement. There are a number of online sources that provide legal alternatives for downloading or otherwise acquiring copyrighted material. A listing of many of these sites can be found at: http://www.educause.edu/legalcontent.

If you have specific questions regarding ASU’s Unauthorized Downloading and File Sharing Policy please contact the

ASU Computing Services Help Desk at 587-7741 or via email at computingservices@adams.edu.

Thanks and have a great semester!